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Algeria
Angola
Benin
Botswana
Burkina Faso
Burundi
Cameroon
Cape Verde
Central African Republic
Chad
Comoros
Congo
Côte d’Ivoire
Djibouti
DRC
Egypt
Equatorial Guinea
Eritrea
Eswatini
Ethiopia
Gabon
Gambia
Ghana
Guinea
Guinea-Bissau
Kenya
Lesotho
Liberia
Libya
Madagascar
Malawi
Mali
Mauritania
Mauritius
Morocco
Mozambique
Namibia
Niger
Nigeria
SADR
São Tomé and Príncipe
Senegal
Seychelles
Sierra Leone
Somalia
South Africa
South Sudan
Sudan
Tanzania
Togo
Tunisia
Uganda
Zambia
Zimbabwe

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Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health
Life expectancy at birth
Maternal mortality ratio
Stillbirth rate
Neonatal mortality rate
Infant mortality rate
Under 5 mortality rate
Antenatal care coverage: 4+ visits
Antenatal care coverage: 8+ visits
Births attended by skilled health personnel
Postpartum care coverage for mothers
Postnatal care coverage for newborns
Exclusive breastfeeding for infants under 6 months
Coverage of first dose of measles vaccination
Stunting - short height for age under age 5
Wasting – low weight for height under age 5
Overweight - heavy for height under 5
Sexual and Reproductive Health
Child marriage before age 15
Child marriage before age 18
Female genital mutilation
Sexual violence by age 18 - female
Sexual violence by age 18 - male
Very early child bearing under age 16
Adolescent birth rate ages 15 to 19
Contraceptive prevalance rate, modern methods, all women
Demand satisfied for modern contraception
Communicable Diseases
New HIV infections
Antiretroviral treatment coverage
Preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV
Condom use
New TB infections
New malaria infections
Non-Communicable Diseases
Mortality from non-communicable diseases
Suicide mortality rate
Current tobacco use among females aged 15 and over
Current tobacco use among males aged 15 and over
Harmful alcohol use aged 15 and over
Health Financing
External health expenditure as % current health expenditure
Government health expenditure as % current health expenditure
Government health expenditure as % GDP
Government health expenditure as % general govt expenditure
Government health expenditure per capita
Out-of-pocket health expenditure as % of current health expenditure
Percentage of national health budget allocated for reproductive health
Health systems and policies
Density of health workers - physicians
Density of health workers - nurses and midwives
Density of health workers - pharmaceutical staff
Qualified obstetricians
Birth registration
At least basic drinking water
At least basic sanitation services
Open defecation
Implementation of AMRH Initiative

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This site is hosted and managed by the African Union and is part of the CARMMA campaign. It has been developed exclusively for the African Union Commission, under the overall guidance of the department of Social Affairs.

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African Health Stats is the online data platform of the African Union Commission’s Department of Social Affairs.

The purpose of the database is to provide reliable data on the progress made by members towards their Maputo Plan of Action (MPoA), Abuja Call and other commitments in line with the mandates of the Social Affairs department.

The site packages data for better advocacy and accountability so that citizens, CSOs and other actors can use the information to hold their government’s accountable for commitments made.

African Health Stats is a tool for member states to engage with the AUC on their MPoA and Abuja Call data and progress. Importantly, it provides vital evidence for the AUC to influence and motivate policy makers to take action on health challenges in the continent. It is powerful way of sharing experiences, best practices and lessons learnt.


Data Sources

The data for each indicator on African Health Stats are generally published by the UN agency, or UN inter-agency group, which holds responsibility for global monitoring of the indicator. This varies by indicator. One exception includes data about the implementation of AMRH initiative, which is derived from the African Union. Please refer to ‘Data Source’.

African Health Stats uses data from the UN sources because such data are internationally comparable and it is the mandate of those agencies to prepare such data and monitor progress internationally. In some cases, the UN agency has made adjustments to the data in order to make national data internationally comparable, for example they may adjust national estimates to account for differences in survey design, the extent of potential underreporting, and the definition of what is being measured (e.g. maternal deaths). This means that at times there may be discrepancies between national and international estimates. Individual countries may prefer to instead rely on national figures for national monitoring. For uniformity, AHStats uses only international estimates of the UN agencies in data visualisations.

Showing data values

Where nationwide surveys have taken place over two calendar years, data values in African Health Stats are reported from the most recent year; for example, data from a 2014-2015 survey are reported as 2015.

Where data are given in original sources for more than one-year periods, the upper year is shown in African Health Stats; for example, for life expectancy at birth for babies born between 2000 -2005, we display the value under the upper year of the five-year period, that is 2005.

For value that are proportions (%), all values are presented rounded to whole numbers when the values are over 1%. For values less than 1%, these are presented to one decimal place, unless otherwise stated.


Abuja Call

The 2006 Abuja Call for Accelerated Action Towards Universal Access to HIV and AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria Services in Africa provides a concrete set of recommendations for renewed effort to respond to the three epidemics. The Call reviews and renews both the 2000 Abuja Declaration and Plan of Action on Roll Back Malaria (RBM) and the 2001 Abuja Declaration and Plan of Action on HIV and AIDS, Tuberculosis and Other Infectious Diseases (ORID).

The Abuja Call is built around seven pillars of action… leadership at national, regional and continental levels; resource mobilisation; protection of rights; poverty reduction; strengthening healthcare systems through disease prevention, treatment, care and support; access to affordable medicines and technologies; research and development accelerating implementation and increasing quality of partnerships, monitoring, evaluation and reporting.

The Call provides a framework for actions at national, regional and continental levels with diversified players including civil society, private sector and development partners.

Maputo Plan of Action

The Maputo Plan of Action (MPoA) for the Operationalization of the Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) Continental Policy Framework seeks to take the African continent closer to its goal of universal access to comprehensive sexual and reproductive health services by 2015.

It was a short-term plan for the period up to 2010 and was later extended to 2015 to coincide with the end of the MDGs. The plan is built upon: integrating  Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) services into PHC; repositioning family planning developing and promoting youth-friendly services; eliminating unsafe abortion; encouraging quality safe motherhood; mobilizing resources; ensuring commodity security; and monitoring and evaluation.

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